The story behind a front-page photo


By : Al-Orjwan Shurrab

On March 30, unarmed Gazan Palestinians marched to the border. Until 1948, the land on the other side had been their families’ home. Then, came the Nakba—“catastrophe”—when Israel was created and they were pushed off their land—many of them forced to settle in the densely packed Gaza Strip. Seventy years have passed and today, about 70 percent of Gaza residents are refugees. On that Friday, more than a quarter of a million Palestinians congregated to march nonviolently to remind the world of their right to return.
Fares Reqeb is shown in the lead, helping to carry out the injured. Later, he too was killed.
One of them was Fares al-Reqeb, 26. He also was one of 22 Palestinian protesters who died from injuries received that day. He was shot in the stomach by one of about 100 Israeli snipers. Doctors believe he was hit by either by an “exploding bullet” or high-velocity munitions normally used for targets a long distance away. He remained anesthetized and unconscious until he died of his wounds three days later, at 7 a.m. April 2 in Khan Younis’ European Hospital.
“We aren’t the terrorists; those who killed Fares are the terrorists,” says Fareed, Fares’ older brother. “We witnessed the Israeli occupation forces shoot an old woman at the border, just before Fares was injured.”
Fares, who lived in a community in the Khan Younis area, in southern Gaza, left school at 17 to try to find work, earning income in construction, supermarkets and restaurants. Nevertheless, despite his hard life, Fareed says Fares was always smiling and loved to play with children. He married his wife, Bader, and had two boys, 3 and 5 years old. Bader is five months pregnant with their third child. Although Fares joined the Islamic Jihad movement in 2015, frequently helping to guard the Gaza borders at night, his family says he participated in the demonstration in a spirit of nonviolent unity. All political factions have come together for the march.
“Fares went to protest peacefully against the occupation of our land,” Bader says. “The martyrdom of Fares shows to the world that Israel is willing to kill Palestinians even if they are peacefully asking for their rights.”
To date, 29 Palestinian protesters have been killed, and 2,850—including 24 women and 81 minors—have been injured. Seventy-nine are in serious condition, according to Ashraf al-Qedra, spokesman for the Gaza Health Ministry. In addition, Israeli authorities confirmed they are holding the bodies of two Palestinians who were killed while trying to cross the border March 30.
Fares and his family grilled lunch at the demonstration
The al-Reqeb family, like many others in the Gaza Strip, was displaced from Jaffa by Israeli occupation forces in 1948. Sixty-eight percent of Gaza residents are refugees, according to the Wafa Information Center. They were forced to move to the Gaza Strip, while others were massacred.
Fares went to the border to protest with a large number of his relatives, including women and children, early Friday morning, March 30. They took a grill and some meat, since they were planning to spend the whole day there. In a photo taken of him and featured on the front page of the U.S. newspaper The Washington Post, Fares is seen helping nurses carry the injured to ambulances.
“He told me he thought he would be killed there, but I thought he was joking,” his nephew, Mohammed, recalls sadly. “My uncle was shot about 60 meters away from the separation fence. Nothing was in his hands; he was not even holding a stone!”
Ismail Haniyeh, the senior political leader of Hamas, which governs Gaza, said in a written statement that the Palestinian right of return to their homeland must be more than a motto.
“Since [U.S. President Donald] Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, many other country leaders have started to support normalization with Israel. Gazan Palestinians are sending a message to the world that for us, there is no alternative than a return to our homeland, Palestine,” Haniyeh said.
Despite the grief of losing her son, Fares’ mother agrees: “We have a right to our land, and we all will sacrifice our souls for the sake of this land. Israel must know that Palestine is ours.”
This story was originally published by We Are Not Numbers
Mentor: Pam Bailey

His weapon was a camera


By: Basman Derawi

On April 6, Palestinian photojournalist Yasser Murtaja was covering Gaza’s Great Return March, a six-week demonstration along the Israeli border to call attention to Palestinians’ right to return to their ancestral homeland. He was shot by an Israeli sniper, dying of his wounds.
Carrying his soul in the palm of his hand,
His heart races to see his homeland.
To tell the truth of his people.
With his naked hands,
With nothing behind his back
Only “press” on his chest,
Witnessing the march.
His weapon is his camera,
The scariest of weapons for his killers.
A bullet explodes in his side;
The sniper who stole his bed
seeks to steal his words. 
His blood flows to the ground, 
His soul travels to the heavens,
Yet his words will live.

This story was originally published by We Are Not Numbers on April 8, 2018

A day of protest in Gaza – By Rana Shubair


By: Rana Shubair – Gaza

On Land Day, March 30, I set out with my three, 12-year-old children, husband and other family members to join an estimated 60,000 other Gazan Palestinians for the first day of the Great Return March by the border with occupied Palestine [Israel]. Each day until May 15, the anniversary of the Nakba [“catastrophe” when more than 750,000 Palestinians were forced from their homeland to create Israel] we will camp by the border to remind the world that we have a right to return home.
With my daughter Huda (left)
It took me 45 minutes to get to the eastern border of Gaza City. We passed through the densely populated neighborhood of al-Shijaea, where a terrible massacre took place during the 2014 Israeli war on Gaza. The streets were congested with Friday morning vendors whose faces reflected the miseries and toils of Gaza life. Mule- and horse-pulled carts dominated al-Mansoura Street as I rode in the car; I realized I had actually never been to that part of the city before!
When we reached the Israeli border area, tents and seating areas places where people were to sit were placed about 700 meters from the fence that separates Gaza from the rest of occupied Palestine. My eyes beheld a heavenly scene of a vast, green area on the other side of my country. (The area now known as Israel has plenty of water, unlike Gaza!) My heart raced and pounded in the same way it had when I went to Jerusalem in 2000 and visited al-Aqsa Mosque. I wanted to run to that oasis and touch the isolated and prohibited area of my homeland. A sudden rush of adrenaline filled my body.
Families sat on the ground with their kids, who wore the national Palestinian dress or camouflage uniforms. When I asked them to pose for a picture, each kid held up the name of the town his/her family originally came from and a sign that read, “We will return.” For a fanciful moment, I imagined that today was actually the day of return. All of the people gathered there greeted each other with, “Inshallah, we will all return.” Gaza happens to be my native homeland, but I was envious, so I said to my friends there: “I’m going back, too. All of Palestine is my country.”
I pointed to the closed border area, where the barbed fence and armed watchtowers were located, and said to my kids with a half-cracked voice, “See, that is Palestine. See how beautiful it is.” As the sirens of ambulances intermingled with the vociferous speeches and national songs, I realized there would always be martyrs. As long as Palestine is not free, and as long as we are locked up in the big cage that is Gaza and denied the right to live like other ordinary humans around the world, there will always be young people willing to sacrifice their lives for the sake of the sacred soil of Palestine.
At that moment, we were all one. Everyone there was united under one flag and one motto: We have a right to return to Palestinians’ historic homeland. This overwhelming feeling of unity long has been missing, especially in Gaza. As I pondered the faces of my people there with me, one fact was clear to me more than ever: None of us had anything more valuable to lose than what we already had—our home.
The fearless ones, mostly young men, ventured close to the border even though they were not armed—they couldn’t resist getting a closer glimpse of their occupied homeland. They were as vulnerable as us women and posed no threat. Yet as they had threatened, Israeli snipers were positioned to kill these dreamers. The Israeli occupation forces also threw teargas canisters at the crowds.

The toll at the end of the day was 16 martyrs and more than 1,500 wounded. But being a Palestinian and standing up for our rights has meant sacrifice since our first displacement in 1948. My family and I will not back down. This story was originally published by We Are Not Numbers

This story was originally published by We Are Not Numbers

54 patients died waiting for Israel to let them out of Gaza


54 patients died waiting for Israel to let them out of Gaza

Cancer patients take part in a December 2016 protest in Gaza City demanding that they be allowed to travel for treatment. In 2017, 54 patients died in Gaza after Israel denied or delayed such permits, the majority of them cancer patients. 

(Mohammed AsadAPA images).

Fifty-four Palestinians died last year waiting for Israeli permits to leave the Gaza Strip for medical treatment.
One of them was Faten Ahmed, a 26-year-old with a rare form of cancer. She died in August while awaiting an Israeli permit to travel for chemotherapy and radiotherapy not available in Gaza.
She had previously missed eight hospital appointments after Israeli “security approval” was delayed or denied, according to the World Health Organization.
Ahmed was one of five women who died from cancer in that month alone waiting for Israeli permission that never came.
Overall, 46 of those who died last year waiting for permits were cancer patients.

Shocking number of deaths

This staggering toll highlights the lethal impact of Israel’s ever-tightening siege on the two million people who live in Gaza.
“We’re seeing Israel increasingly deny or delay access to potentially life-saving cancer and other treatment outside Gaza, with shockingly high numbers of Palestinian patients subsequently dying, while Gaza’s healthcare system – subjected to half a century of occupation and a decade of blockade – is decreasingly able to meet the needs of its population,” Aimee Shalan, CEO of Medical Aid for Palestinians, said on Tuesday.
Her charity, along with Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Al Mezan Center for Human Rights and Physicians for Human Rights Israel, has issued an urgent call on Israel to “lift the unlawful sweeping restrictions on the freedom of movement of people from Gaza, most critically those with significant health problems.”
In 2017 Israeli occupation authorities approved just 54 percent of applications for permits to leave Gaza for medical appointments, the lowest rate since the World Health Organization began collecting data in 2008.
Israel has dramatically tightened the deadly squeeze; its approval rate for permits fell from 92 percent in 2012 to 82 percent in 2014 and then 62 percent in 2016, before hitting its lowest point last year.
The health and human rights groups note that the UN and the International Committee of the Red Cross have declared Israel’s land, sea and air blockade on Gaza, preventing the movement of its population, to be “collective punishment” – a war crime.
“Palestinians from Gaza missed at least 11,000 scheduled medical appointments in 2017 after Israeli authorities denied or failed to respond in time to applications for permits,” the groups state.

Egypt and Palestinian Authority complicit

The groups also note that Egypt and the Ramallah-based Palestinian Authority played a role in worsening the situation: “Egypt has kept the Rafah crossing mostly closed for the population in Gaza since 2013, which contributed to restricting access to health care.”
“As a state bordering a territory with a protracted humanitarian crisis, Egypt should facilitate humanitarian access for the population,” they state. “Nevertheless, ultimate responsibility remains with Israel, the occupying power.”
The Palestinian Authority also sharply reduced its financial approvals for medical treatment outside Gaza as part of its sanctions aimed at forcing Hamas to hand over control of the governance of Gaza.
These PA restrictions resulted in at least one death, according to the groups. But medical authorities in Gaza have said that more than a dozen people, including a 3-year-old girl with a heart condition, died waiting for payment approval from Ramallah.
All of this comes amid the protracted siege-induced crisis which has brought the collapse of key parts of the health system.
“Amid widespread poverty and unemployment, at least 10 percent of young children are stunted by chronic malnutrition, up to half of all medicines and medical items in Gaza are completely depleted or below one month’s supply, and chronic electricity shortages have caused officials to cut health and other essential services,” the human rights and medical groups state.

End the siege

Earlier this month, hospitals in Gaza began shutting down as emergency generators ran out of fuel, forcing the postponement of hundreds of operations.
On Wednesday, RT posted this report from Gaza about the plight of cancer patients. Correspondent Anya Parampil spoke to Zakia Tafish whose husband Jamil died after he was repeatedly blocked from traveling to Jerusalem for surgery.

The channel also aired a report about the worsening situation in the territory’s hospitals.
Following UN warnings of looming catastrophe, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates last week pledged $11 million in short-term funding to stave off an even worse catastrophe for another few months.
However, as the human rights groups note, there is no long-term solution but to end the siege.
“The Israeli government’s restrictions on movement are directly connected to patient deaths and compounded suffering as ill patients seek permits,” Al Mezan director Issam Younis said.
“These practices form part of the closure and permit regime that prevents patients from a life of dignity, and violates the right to life.”
The UK-based Medical Aid for Palestinians is calling on the public to contact lawmakers in the British parliament and “ask them to urge the UK government to take action and save lives in Gaza.”

We will not go down (Song for Gaza) – Michael Heart


We will not go down (Song for Gaza) – Michael Heart

We will not go down (Song for Gaza) – Michael Heart. The first American song and video clip about Gaza, it will shock you, this is a part of the truth about Palestine

We will not go down Lyrics is about guerra palestina, guerra de israel, and palestinian on Gaza, their hope and spirit. We will not go down Lyrics (Composed and Copyright 2009 by Michael Heart)

A blinding flash of white light
Lit up the sky over Gaza tonight
People running for cover
Not knowing whether they’re dead or alive

They came with their tanks and their planes
With ravaging fiery flames
And nothing remains
Just a voice rising up in the smoky haze

We will not go down
In the night, without a fight
You can burn up our mosques and our homes and our schools
But our spirit will never die
We will not go down
In Gaza tonight

Women and children alike
Murdered and massacred night after night
While the so-called leaders of countries afar
Debated on who’s wrong or right

But their powerless words were in vain
And the bombs fell down like acid rain
But through the tears and the blood and the pain
You can still hear that voice through the smoky haze

We will not go down
In the night, without a fight
You can burn up our mosques and our homes and our schools
But our spirit will never die
We will not go down
In Gaza tonight.

We will not go down (Song for Gaza) – Michael Heart


We will not go down (Song for Gaza) – Michael Heart

We will not go down (Song for Gaza) – Michael Heart. The first American song and video clip about Gaza, it will shock you, this is a part of the truth about Palestine

We will not go down Lyrics is about guerra palestina, guerra de israel, and palestinian on Gaza, their hope and spirit. We will not go down Lyrics (Composed and Copyright 2009 by Michael Heart)

A blinding flash of white light
Lit up the sky over Gaza tonight
People running for cover
Not knowing whether they’re dead or alive

They came with their tanks and their planes
With ravaging fiery flames
And nothing remains
Just a voice rising up in the smoky haze

We will not go down
In the night, without a fight
You can burn up our mosques and our homes and our schools
But our spirit will never die
We will not go down
In Gaza tonight

Women and children alike
Murdered and massacred night after night
While the so-called leaders of countries afar
Debated on who’s wrong or right

But their powerless words were in vain
And the bombs fell down like acid rain
But through the tears and the blood and the pain
You can still hear that voice through the smoky haze

We will not go down
In the night, without a fight
You can burn up our mosques and our homes and our schools
But our spirit will never die
We will not go down
In Gaza tonight.

Lauren Booth, her journey to Islam and Palestine


About Lauren Booth:

I’d like this space to reflect the kind of work I do as well as giving you an idea about who I am. I live by the mantra that all it takes for evil to thrive is that good men sit on the sofa whingeing about speed cameras. So I’ve linked to some great protest organisations and charities that need your support – why not take a look? Meanwhile, If you consider Iraqi civilians ‘collataral damage’ or that global warming is a faster way to get a tan, please feel free to google ‘Richard Littlejohn’. To everyone else, peace, and thanks for your visit.
Lauren is a broadcaster and journalist, outspoken on issues as diverse as childhood vaccinations and the war in Iraq. She has presented shows for television and radio and regularly guests on programmes across themedia. She has regular columns in the Mail on Sunday and writes features for the Sunday Times and Femail.
As a journalist, Lauren has written for the New Statesman, the Mail on Sunday, the Sunday Times and the Daily Mail. She is a vocal opponent of the Iraq War and a supporter of the Stop the War Coalition; a member of Woodcraft Folk, Media Workers Against the War and the National Union of Journalists. She has been a panellist on the BBC’s Have I Got News For You, and a broadcaster on radio and television. She writes columns and features, mainly for the Mail on Sunday.
In both 2005 and 2006 Lauren travelled to the West Bank where she has interviewed Mahmoud Abbas. She gave two speeches on the condition of those living in the West Bank and Gaza, for the Royal Geographical Society and Arab Media Watch. In 2006 she was a contestant on the ITV reality show I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!, donating the money she raised to Interpal. Lauren currently presents ‘Remember Palestine’ and ‘Diaspora’ on Press TV. Alongside working with Faith Matters on a project relating to women and the hijab in the UK.

Source:

http://www.laurenbooth.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=45:welcome-to-my-web-site

Talk by Lauren Booth about her journey to Islam and Palestine 

Source:

http://lauren-booth.blogspot.com/2012/03/talk-by-lauren-booth-about-her-journey.html

My Journey to Islam and Palestine – Lauren Booth

Short History of Israeli Genocide in Gaza

 

Lauren Booth blog 

Lauren Booth site:

 

 

 

 

 

A Road To Mecca – The Journey of Muhammad Asad

A Road To Mecca – The Journey of Muhammad Asad http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfZjarfKigA

THE ROAD TO MAKKAH
by Muhammad Asad

Source:

 http://kep.org.sa/new/library/The_Road_to_makkah.pdf

Latest Blogs

 YouTube Video

Source:

http://www.youtube.com/results?&search_query=lauren+booth

Lauren Booth, her journey to Islam and Palestine


About Lauren Booth:

I’d like this space to reflect the kind of work I do as well as giving you an idea about who I am. I live by the mantra that all it takes for evil to thrive is that good men sit on the sofa whingeing about speed cameras. So I’ve linked to some great protest organisations and charities that need your support – why not take a look? Meanwhile, If you consider Iraqi civilians ‘collataral damage’ or that global warming is a faster way to get a tan, please feel free to google ‘Richard Littlejohn’. To everyone else, peace, and thanks for your visit.
Lauren is a broadcaster and journalist, outspoken on issues as diverse as childhood vaccinations and the war in Iraq. She has presented shows for television and radio and regularly guests on programmes across themedia. She has regular columns in the Mail on Sunday and writes features for the Sunday Times and Femail.
As a journalist, Lauren has written for the New Statesman, the Mail on Sunday, the Sunday Times and the Daily Mail. She is a vocal opponent of the Iraq War and a supporter of the Stop the War Coalition; a member of Woodcraft Folk, Media Workers Against the War and the National Union of Journalists. She has been a panellist on the BBC’s Have I Got News For You, and a broadcaster on radio and television. She writes columns and features, mainly for the Mail on Sunday.
In both 2005 and 2006 Lauren travelled to the West Bank where she has interviewed Mahmoud Abbas. She gave two speeches on the condition of those living in the West Bank and Gaza, for the Royal Geographical Society and Arab Media Watch. In 2006 she was a contestant on the ITV reality show I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!, donating the money she raised to Interpal. Lauren currently presents ‘Remember Palestine’ and ‘Diaspora’ on Press TV. Alongside working with Faith Matters on a project relating to women and the hijab in the UK.

Source:

http://www.laurenbooth.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=45:welcome-to-my-web-site

Talk by Lauren Booth about her journey to Islam and Palestine 

Source:

http://lauren-booth.blogspot.com/2012/03/talk-by-lauren-booth-about-her-journey.html

My Journey to Islam and Palestine – Lauren Booth

Short History of Israeli Genocide in Gaza

 

Lauren Booth blog 

Lauren Booth site:

 

 

 

 

 

A Road To Mecca – The Journey of Muhammad Asad

A Road To Mecca – The Journey of Muhammad Asad http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfZjarfKigA

THE ROAD TO MAKKAH
by Muhammad Asad

Source:

 http://kep.org.sa/new/library/The_Road_to_makkah.pdf

Latest Blogs

 YouTube Video

WHY WHITE WOMEN BECOME MUSLIM. ISLAM OPPRESSIVE TO WOMEN?

 

Source:

http://www.youtube.com/results?&search_query=lauren+booth

Silence is worst form of the violence: Words i Never Said


I think that all the silence is worse than all the violence.

Below picture is a true state of us. 

I am raising a question to look for answers. making a question so people can look for answers why vote and why not vote and if A and B are same why to vote and if system is same what vote for. If Mr C and D is doing campaign to get elected and in past me A and B started few oppressor deeds and C and D are elected on basis they gonna eradicate or overcome from those and there will be peace and C and D gonna wages some other oppression or someother humanity on some other land of humans so A and B and C and D are all the same issue is not these characters or Alphabets but the Systems and its Roots so *Mark Twain* pointed it at his time. So why not saying and claiming and slogans of change rather changing the system and work to eradicate by raising voice and sorting our the root causes of this bloodshed and truly working and help the humanity and humankind.
Mr A or Mr O elected again through a very precise but deceptive mechanism of voting and what he gonna do nothing but cleaning the garbage of the past one and starting the new garbage/oppression to people of his nation as well to other nations. WHY not anyone talk about who is doing censorship for the nation? WHY not anyone ask before waging a war on any part of humanity or land and people ? Why not they ask for any change in system? And why not no one and none of them raise the voice and fear of what ? being eliminated ? being cleaned ? or being terminated for the seat? So May Answer is yes and again yes. If anyone of them is raising voice to change the system and trying to get elected for only this cause that its a *CHANGE* and People belong to any nation are suppose to elect and select and vote.  And why not raising question to let the people get answer.

Answers meet to us when we look for them and our thirst is what we need and this thirst is called A change and this change comes when we break the ICE or when we break the cycle or when we break that System.

#election #usaelections2012 #election2012 #USA 
Don’t believe any govt trash talk

#atrocity #burma #burmagenocide #Arakan #arakan #killing #murder #wakeup #muslim #muslimsinburma #muslimsgenocide #muslims #rohingya #rohingyamuslims #genocide
#Burma’s #Rohingya #kashmir #syria #palestine #pakistan #oppressors #drones #Gaza #massacre

Silence is worst crime and a time come when we have to pay for the silence we kept when innocent being killing near or far from you. So speak before your time is over.

#iraq #afghanistan #egypt #syria #bahrain #bosniaandherzegovina #bosnia #burmagenocide #rohingya #rohingyamuslims #rohingyainjustice #pakistan #kashmir #sandy   #media #USA #UK #PAK #humanity  

 Silence is worst form of the violence

Silence is a Violence

Media at east or west act with responsibility. world taking care but who for Help them before its too late 
Whats very important for us A life, our food, Humanity, games, our kids, discussions, talks or To Take care the Victim of killing
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Are we all waiting for the HOUR or gonna talk about oppressor or a victim who can not help them and why not raising voices for Y?
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WHY and WHY you do not talk about massive bloodshed, Is our daily jobs are more important than , Its Time